Wednesday, February 6, 2013


Black patients are less satisfied with care from doctors who show unintentional bias. Highly segregated areas have disparities in lung cancer death rates, research shows.

By Kevin B. O'Reilly, amednews staff Jan. 28, 2013.

 Two studies published in January highlight the challenges blacks face in accessing equitable, quality health care. In one study, primary care physicians found to have unconscious bias against blacks received lower marks from their African-American patients on measures of trust and communication skills. Another study found that racial segregation exacerbates disparities in lung cancer mortality. More than 130 Denver-area primary care doctors and other health professionals such as nurse practitioners took psychological tests that measure implicit bias toward different racial and ethnic groups. Test takers were shown a series of faces, along with positive words such as “joy” and bad words such as “nasty.”  [...]

Read the entire article in American Medical News:

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